Friday, 22 March 2019

One more tease, a few more clues.

The answer next, I promise , though I am sure you all know by now.
12. Although her first marriage started off well, after a few years
things went badly wrong when her husband fell in love with his
(female) golf partner. Next she disappeared and had half the
country speculating whether her husband had murdered her (by
then she had produced one or two books and was already a
household name of sorts).
13. Fortunately her husband was innocent, and so in her second
marriage she chose someone not only 15 years younger than she
was, but about as different as she could get from her first husband.
For instance whereas her first husband was a Colonel in the army,
was mentioned five times in dispatches and at the end of the war
received a DSO and CMG, her second husband was already
passionately anti-militaristic (not quite the thing to be in jingoistic
Edwardian England) as a schoolboy. In fact he once joined one of
his schoolmates, Evelyn Waugh, in a rebellion against the
headmaster as they refused to drill. Furthermore, whereas her first
husband became a successful business man and was a director on
the boards of several financial and investment companies, her
second husband, after graduating from Oxford, decided to dig up
old pot shreds and the like for a living.

14. In any case after all the hullabaloo around the breakup of her first marriage she decided to avoid the limelight and the press by
temporarily moving to the Isle of Skye so that her bans for her
second marriage could run there
15. She also had a fare share of eccentricities – for instance when
looking around to purchase a new bath (or what the Yanks would
call a tub) for a house she had bought, she insisted that it should
have a wide border to place the apples on that she enjoyed eating
while bathing.
16. Then she also had a weakness for buying houses (at one point in her life she owned no less than eight) and shoes. Thus no wonder she once ran into a bit of bother with a Turkish customs officer over the volume of footwear she was transporting – and that out into the Syrian desert where her husband was hot on the trail of old pieces of clay pots.
17. But to get back to the advice of her mother – after she saw her first story in print it seems she never stopped writing and in a career that lasted for more than half a century she wrote

 72 novels
 An autobiography
 A memoir of her expedition to Syria
 Two books of poetry
 Another book of poems and children’s stories
 More than a dozen stage and radio mysteries
 And around 150 short stories

18. Her books have been translated into at least 103 languages and it is
estimated that between 2 and 4 billion have been sold.
19. And although she died more than 40 years ago annually more than five million of her books are still being bought.
20. Following on the Bible and Shakespeare’s works, her works ranks third as the world’s most-widely published books - thus no wonder the Guinness World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist of all time
I m ure you all know, but there are a few more interesting facts to come.

Thursday, 14 March 2019

Some more clues - if you haven't got it yet.

Guess who? Some more clues:
7. As her first career choice in life was to become a concert pianist
she spent some time studying music at a conservatory in Paris.
However, being very shy, she absolutely “froze” the first time she
had to play to an audience and thus gave up on this as a vocation.
8. Surprisingly (considering her shyness) she next decided to become
an opera singer. But as her voice was not up to the mark it was
suggested that she should rather opt for choral singing - however
as this was not for her she dropped the whole idea.
9. When she was 11 years old she had one of her poems published in
a local paper. Thus some years later when she was 18 and lying
bored in bed after recovering from flu her mother suggested that
she should try and write something again to keep herself busy.
10. She followed this advice and initially toyed with one or two short
stories before she eventually tackled something longer. She sent
her first manuscript to Hodder and Stoughton who were not
interested and sent it back, next it went elsewhere and was also
returned, after this she sent it to Methuen who also returned it. So
eventually she sent it to The Bodley Head where it landed in file
13. She also forgot about it as her husband (who she had married
during WW1) had just returned from the war, she was expecting a
baby, and they were more concerned with settling down.
11. But then two years later, John Lane of The Bodley Head called her
to discuss the manuscript, and eventually it was published as her
first book (cf. * below).
12. Although her first marriage started off well, after a few years
things went badly wrong when her husband fell in love with his
(female) golf partner. Next she disappeared and had half the
country speculating whether her husband had murdered her (by
then she had produced one or two books and was already a
household name of sorts).
If you are still not sure, all will be revealed next week.

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

A little Quiz for you: Guess who?

Here are a few clues: See if you an identify her. If not, watch this space for more clues.We will post them next week.

The girl who listened to her mother

Once upon a time there was a girl who listened to her mother – and although she did not exactly “live happily ever after” she never regretted it.
In a way she was a bit of an enigma: She was very shy and hated publicity (particularly photographers),
Apart from Churchill and the Queen she was probably one of the best known Brits of the 20th century.
1. Her father was a rather staid American who came from a moneyed family and spent his life between his study and his club, whereas her mother was much more of an eccentric go-getter who at timessuffered from “advanced ideas”.
For instance, she believed that no child should be allowed to read before it was eight years old as the longer the delay the better it was for the eyes as well as the brain.
2. Irrespective of her mother’s ideas her sister (who was 11 years
older) gave her a book as a present when she was three years old
and her father mentions that by age six she could already write
with a pencil and was graduating to “ink and an italic nib.”
3. As she taught herself to read by matching meaning to the
appearance of entire words she never bothered much with spelling, with the result that later on this was always a hit-and-miss sort of affair. But at times she could be a bit testy about it – for instance she once slammed an editor who had changed phantasy to fantacy in one of her manuscripts – pointing out that both appear in the English dictionary.
4. What is rather surprising (and not commonly known) is that she
never attended a school, nor was she ever tutored at home.
(Technically this is not quite true. For a short time, when she was
about 13, she attended arithmetic and grammar classes twice a
week at Miss Guyer’s Girls School in Torquay. However, this did
not last long as she found it too boring.)
5. Thus her only worthwhile formal education came much later when
she was already grown up and had to study physics and chemistry
in order to qualify as a pharmacy dispenser during the First World
War (This is obviously where she also learnt about various poisons
etc. – knowledge which was most useful in her later career.)
6. Apparently she also enjoyed mathematics as well as thinking about the new fangled concept of relativity, thus at a time she even
tackled The Mysterious Universe by Sir James Jeans - a classic of the time.

See you ext week. I got to number 6 before I recognised her. Interesting person she was - I did not know her background.

Tuesday, 12 February 2019

Ever heard of "The second Cuckoo"? (And Marmalade)

Thank you Dan Steyn for this little gem.
On a day, a number of years ago, in a little second hand bookshop in the Strand, I came across a book with a rather interesting title: The Second Cuckoo – A New Selection of Letters to the Times since 1900, so obviously I bought it. I then started searching for The First Cuckoo, but as far as I could establish it was long since out of print. Then some years later I was once again looking trough some old books upstairs in Clarke’s Bookshop (in Longstreet) when right in front of eyes there was not only The First Cuckoo but also The Third Cuckoo.
 So let me present you with a sample of one of my favourite morsels out of The Second Cuckoo.  This is what endears the English (or should I rather say some English traditions) to me.
I remember old General de Gaulle, in exasperation, once exclaimed:   “How can you govern a country that has two hundred and forty-six varieties of cheese?” I can well understand his problem, but what I fail to grasp is how the Brits, who cannot agree on the origin of single conserve that they plaster on their toast every morning, can ever hope to pull themselves together to decide how they are going to deal with Brexit.

Following are the letters that appeared in The Second Cucko.

From the Reverend  E S Haviland  11 July 1973
Sir,
What a dangerous omission. A loyal English knight defends and extols the excellence of the English breakfast without a mention of English marmalade (Sir Dinglc Foot, special article, 30 June).
Yours faithfully,
EDMUND S. HAVLAND

From Mr Peter Macdonald  13 July 1973
Sir,
Despite the strictures of the Rev, E. S. Haviland, Sir Dingle Foot is undoubtedly correct in omitting marmalade from an English breakfast. Marmalade, like many other inventions, which other nations have sought to appropriate, is of Scottish origin, since it took a canny Scot to see value in the peel that others threw away.
Yours faithfully,
PETER B. MACDONALD

Prom Mr C. S. Dence  16 July 1973
Sir,
Surely the Rev. E. S. Haviland is correct, and by what right does Peter Macdonald claim English marmalade to be Scottish? These are vital matters of national prestige and I put forward as my authority a certain Gervase Markham (I568-1617) who published a recipe for Marmalade of Oranges in, please note, his English Huswife. Scottish indeed! Let Peter Macdonald substantiate his prior claim!
Yours faithfully,
COLIN S. DENCE

From Mr John Orr  16 July 1973
Sir,
In reference to certain letters on the subject of marmalade, I have heard that it was derived from a confection prepared by the chef for Mary Queen of Scots when she was married to the Dauphin of France and was indisposed. The word marmalade is a corruption of the phrase Marie est malade. This may be a little far-fetched but it has the ring of truth.
Yours faithfully,
JOHN ORR
From Lady Antonia Fraser  17 July 1973
Sir,
Alas, I do not think Mr John Orr can be correct in suggesting that marmalade was first prepared for Mary Queen of Scots. I too had been brought up to believe in the story of the chef in the French royal kitchens, hearing of the illness of the child Queen, and muttering frenziedly ‘Marie est maladeMarie est malade’ over and over again as he stirred a confection of oranges, until they turned by mistake into a delicious golden mixture.
On inspection this proved to be yet another example of those legends which surely ought to be true because they are so appealing - but unfortunately are not. The Oxford English Dictionary gives a 1480 date far the word marmalade, deriving from the Portuguese marmelo - a quince. A Portuguese origin for marmalade?
Yours faithfully,
ANTONIA FRASER

From Mr G Pazzi-Axworlhy 19 July 1973
Sir,
I should like to know the nationality of the people who were enjoying bitter oranges for their afters when Mr Peter Mac-Donald's canny Scot saw them throw the peel away.
Yours faithfully,
GEORGE PAZZI-AXWORTHY

From Mrs Joan Richards  20 July 1973
Sir,
I have read that the Duke of Wellington in the Peninsular Wars much enjoyed the conserves of our ally Portugal and asked his aide-de-camp to send home to England a crate of quince preserve (marmelada) and another of orange jam. But the aid-de-camp made a mistake with labelling the crates and Portuguese orange jam was henceforth known in England as marmalade. Before this time marmalade had a broader meaning, referring to conserves made of quinces, oranges and other similar fruits. This I think is Lady Antonia Fraser's Portuguese origin for marmalade.
Yours faithfully,
JOAN RICHARDS

From Mr Morley Kennerley  20 July 1973
Sir,
It would be interesting to know why and when orange marmalade became standard for breakfast here, for abroad one never knows until one sees it on the tray of what fruit the breakfast conserve will be made.
Yours faithfully,
MORLEY KENNERLEY

(Now I can realise why a German friend from Paderborn in Germany, on his visits to the Cape, always referred to any type of jam as “marmalade” – irrespective of my efforts to convince him that the latter name is limited to conserves made from citrus fruits.)

From Mrs Helen Grant  23 July 1973
Sir,
Lady Antonia Fraser is on the right track when she suggests that our marmalade had its origin in the Portuguese mormelo - quince, But surely we got the word from the Spanish mermelada? In the Spanish Academy Dictionary the derivation of mermelada is given as from the Latin melimelum, quince. In Spanish mermelada means quince jam or jam made from other fruits; so orange marmalade in Spanish is mermelada de naranja.
It seems likely that since our marmalade is traditionally made from Seville oranges then it was from Spain that we got the name marmalade for orange jam.
Yours faithfully,
HELEN F. GRANT

From Miss Elizabeth Inman  23 July 1973
Sir,
I too heard that the name of marmalade derived from a confection prepared for Mary Queen of Scots. But my story told that she was prone to seasickness and found this preparation effective for ‘Mer Malade’.
Yours very sincerely,
ELIZABETH INMAN

From Sir John Carswell  23 Ju1y 1973
Sir,
The whole matter, including the answer to the question put by Mr Pazzi-Axworlhy, is dealt with in a poem by Hilaire Belloc who wrote:
The haughty nobles of Seville
Could find no use for orange peel
Yours etc.,
JOHN CARSWELL

From Emeritus Professor G. F. Trease  24 July 1973
Sir,
The Duke of Wellington was by no means the first Englishman to use marmalade. It is mentioned as ‘marmaled’ in the English translation of Renodaeus’ Dispensatory published in 1657 by the London apothecary Richard Tomlinson. An earlier reference is in the inventory of Thomas Baskerville, apothecary of Exeter, who died in 1596. This lists ‘marmalade 11 lbs, 10 shillings’. Another item, apparently an early form of our biscuits, reads ‘biskye bred, 8 lbs 5s 4d’.
Yours faithfully,
G. E. TREASE

From Mr Thomas McLachlan  30 July 1973
Sir,
I have read the correspondence about marmalade with considerate interest, but can only conclude that some of your correspondents have not adequately considered the implications of their information.
Lady Antonia Fraser is correct in quoting the date- 1480 for the use of the word, as given in the Oxford Dictionary, but the Oxford Dictionary gives no information about the context in which the word is used.
Professor Trease quotes Renodaeus’s Dispensatory but although a reference is given to Marmaled in the index as p 171, I have been unable to find any reference to the word in the book itself. This is not uncommon with books of this period and it would appear that Renodaeus expects his readers to know that marmaled is the same thing as marzipan. He makes no reference to marmalade under either lemon or orange.
My Spanish dictionary makes no mention of oranges being used for marmalade, but describes it as a ‘preserve of fruits’. Larousse's large French dictionary devotes some space to marmalade as a confection of fruits, which have been reduced to the form of gruel. The only recipe given is for apple marmalade, and at the end the apples are passed through a sieve to smash them up.
I have not had the advantage of seeing Gevase Markham’s recipe (I6 July), but in 1767 A Lady in The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy gives recipes for both orange and quince marmalade which would produce a sweet, smooth confection not at all like the marmalade we know.
In spite of Mr Dence’s (16 July) it was in 1797 that an extra large shipload oranges available at Dundee and the enterprising Mrs. Keilier bought them and converted them into marmalade. She was so successful that the firm prospered and her younger son invented a cutting machine to slice the oranges instead of grating them. For many years Keillers marketed their marmalade in white porcelain jars with black print on the front ‘James Keiller and Sons Ltd. The Original Dundee Marmalade’, and this claim has never been challenged. Orange marmalade, as we know it is essentially British and comparatively modern.
Yours faithfully,
THOMAS MCLACHLAN

Years ago, when they started with the housing projects in what is now Delft (next to the road that comes down from Stellenbosch and runs through to Modderdam Rd), this set off quite a trade in antique bottles and jars. The old (Victorian era) rubbish dumps of Cape Town used to be in this area and were now being dug into with all the housing projects going on - hence the appearance of a variety of “bottle stalls” next to the road.
This was also the road that I used to travel to the University of the Western Cape, and once or twice I bought some of these jars. Reading the last letter in our little marmalade debate above (the letter of Mr Thomas McLachlan) something sounded familiar, so I had a look through the bottles and jars I had bought – and there it was - a beautiful porcelain jar with James Keiller and Sons Ltd. The Original Dundee Marmalade printed on it. See the attachment for a picture.


Virus-free. www.avast.com
Attachments area

Monday, 27 August 2018

Should we be concerned with the new normal in reading??



Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound


When the reading brain skims texts, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings or to perceive beauty. We need a new literacy for the digital age
Look around on your next plane trip. The iPad is the new pacifier for babies and toddlers. Younger school-aged children read stories on smartphones; older boys don’t read at all, but hunch over video games. Parents and other passengers read on Kindles or skim a flotilla of email and news feeds. Unbeknownst to most of us, an invisible, game-changing transformation links everyone in this picture: the neuronal circuit that underlies the brain’s ability to read is subtly, rapidly changing - a change with implications for everyone from the pre-reading toddler to the expert adult.

As work in neurosciences indicates, the acquisition of literacy necessitated a new circuit in our species’ brain more than 6,000 years ago. That circuit evolved from a very simple mechanism for decoding basic information, like the number of goats in one’s herd, to the present, highly elaborated reading brain. My research depicts how the present reading brain enables the development of some of our most important intellectual and affective processes: internalized knowledge, analogical reasoning, and inference; perspective-taking and empathy; critical analysis and the generation of insight. Research surfacing in many parts of the world now cautions that each of these essential “deep reading” processes may be under threat as we move into digital-based modes of reading

 There’s an old rule in neuroscience that does not alter with age: "use it or lose it"

This is not a simple, binary issue of print vs digital reading and technological innovation. As MIT scholar Sherry Turkle has written, we do not err as  a society when we innovate, but when we ignore what we disrupt or diminish while innovating. In this hinge moment between print and digital cultures, society needs to confront what is diminishing in the expert reading circuit, what our children and older students are not developing, and what we can do about it.                    We know from research that the reading circuit is not given to human beings through a genetic blueprint like vision or language; it needs an environment to develop. Further, it will adapt to that environment’s requirements – from different writing systems to the characteristics of whatever medium is used. If the dominant medium advantages processes that are fast, multi-task oriented and well-suited for large volumes of information, like the current digital medium, so will the reading circuit. As UCLA psychologist Patricia Greenfield writes, the result is that less attention and time will be allocated to slower, time-demanding deep reading processes, like inference, critical analysis and empathy, all of which are indispensable to learning at any age.                        This is not a simple, binary issue of print vs digital reading and technological innovation. As MIT scholar Sherry Turkle has written, we do not err as  a society when we innovate, but when we ignore what we disrupt or diminish while innovating. In this hinge moment between print and digital cultures, society needs to confront what is diminishing in the expert reading circuit, what our children and older students are not developing, and what we can do about it.                    We know from research that the reading circuit is not given to human beings through a genetic blueprint like vision or language; it needs an environment to develop. Further, it will adapt to that environment’s requirements – from different writing systems to the characteristics of whatever medium is used. If the dominant medium advantages processes that are fast, multi-task oriented and well-suited for large volumes of information, like the current digital medium, so will the reading circuit. As UCLA psychologist Patricia Greenfield writes, the result is that less attention and time will be allocated to slower, time-demanding deep reading processes, like inference, critical analysis and empathy, all of which are indispensable to learning at any age.
"The negative effects of screen reading can appear as early as fourth and fifth grade"              
Increasing reports from educators and from researchers in psychology and the humanities bear this out. English literature scholar and teacher Mark Edmundson describes how many college students actively avoid the classic literature of the 19th and 20th centuries because they no longer have the patience to read longer, denser, more difficult texts. We should be less concerned with students’ “cognitive impatience,” however, than by what may underlie it: the potential inability of large numbers of students to read with a level of critical analysis sufficient to comprehend the complexity of thought and argument found in more demanding texts, whether in literature and science in college, or in wills, contracts and the deliberately confusing public referendum questions citizens encounter in the voting booth.                              Multiple studies show that digital screen use may be causing a variety of troubling downstream effects on reading comprehension in older high school and college students. In Stavanger, Norway, psychologist Anne Mangen and her colleagues studied how high school students comprehend the same material in different mediums. Mangen’s group asked subjects questions about a short story whose plot had universal student appeal (a lust-filled, love story); half of the students read Jenny, Mon Amour on a Kindle, the other half in paperback. Results indicated that students who read on print were superior in their comprehension to screen-reading peers, particularly in their ability to sequence detail and reconstruct the plot in chronological order.                                            Ziming Liu from San Jose State University has conducted a series of studies which indicate that the “new norm” in reading is skimming, with word-spotting and browsing through the text. Many readers now use an F or Z pattern when reading in which they sample the first line and then word-spot through the rest of the text. When the reading brain skims like this, it reduces time allocated to deep reading processes. In other words, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings, to perceive beauty, and to create thoughts of the reader’s own.                    Karin Littau and Andrew Piper have noted another dimension: physicality. Piper, Littau and Anne Mangen’s group emphasize that the sense of touch in print reading adds an important redundancy to information – a kind of “geometry” to words, and a spatial “thereness” for text. As Piper notes, human beings need a knowledge of where they are in time and space that allows them to return to things and learn from re-examination – what he calls the “technology of recurrence”. The importance of recurrence for both young and older readers involves the ability to go back, to check and evaluate one’s understanding of a text. The question, then, is what happens to comprehension when our youth skim on a screen whose lack of spatial thereness discourages “looking back.”                                                              US media researchers Lisa Guernsey and Michael Levine, American University’s linguist Naomi Baron, and cognitive scientist Tami Katzir from Haifa University have examined the effects of different information mediums, particularly on the young. Katzir’s research has found that the negative effects of screen reading can appear as early as fourth and fifth grade - with implications not only for comprehension, but also on the growth of empathy.                                                                     We need to cultivate a new kind of brain                  The possibility that critical analysis, empathy and other deep reading processes could become the unintended “collateral damage” of our digital culture is not a simple binary issue about print vs digital reading. It is about how we all have begun to read on any medium and how that changes not only what we read, but also the purposes for why we read. Nor is it only about the young. The subtle atrophy of critical analysis and empathy affects us all. It affects our ability to navigate a constant bombardment of information. It incentivizes a retreat to the most familiar silos of unchecked information, which require and receive no analysis, leaving us susceptible to false information and demagoguery.
To survive our high-speed society, cultivate 'temporal bandwidth'
Alan Jacobs                                                          There’s an old rule in neuroscience that does not alter with age: use it or lose it. It is a very hopeful principle when applied to critical thought in the reading brain because it implies choice. The story of the changing reading brain is hardly finished. We possess both the science and the technology to identify and redress the changes in how we read before  they become
readingentrenched. If we work to understand exactly what we will lose, alongside the extraordinary new capacities that the digital world has brought us, there is as much reason for excitement as caution.                               We need to cultivate a new kind of brain: a “bi-literate” reading brain capable of the deepest forms of thought in either digital or traditional mediums. A great deal hangs on it: the ability of citizens in a vibrant democracy to try on other perspectives and discern truth; the capacity of our children and grandchildren to appreciate and create beauty; and the ability in ourselves to go beyond our present glut of information to reach the knowledge and wisdom necessary to sustain a good society.                                        Maryanne Wolf is the author of Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World. 




Tuesday, 27 March 2018

For those that asked: here are the answers to have you ever heard of?


l will spare you the agony of guessing. Both groups were authors who published approximately during the same time period; however the first group were all awarded the Nobel Prize for literature and the second group not.

It even gets worse than this as there was something of a scandal when Tolstoy was snubbed for the inaugural Nobel Prize for Literature in 1901, which resulted in 42 Swedish writers and artists (among them the playwright August Strindberg) writing to the Academy complaining about their misjudgement. But in spite of this he was he was nominated no less than 10 times for the prize but was passed over each time, and thus never received it.

But it isn’t only the Academy who get it wrong – publishers are sometimes not much better as the following example will illustrate.

In 1900 Miss Beatrice Potter, a London spinster with a penchant for painting watercolours of toadstools, wrote a book called Peter Rabit which was rejected by six publishers. She then published it herself, whereupon one of the publishers who initially rejected the manuscript, decided to publish any further editions but on condition that she had to finance it herself – well, she did, and three years later the sales topped 75 000 copies. I’m sure there was a publisher who could kick himelf. However, in later years some of her coleagues didn’t do much better. For instance

M.A.S.H. was turned down by 21 publishers

Lorna Doone was turned down by 18 publishers

The Silent Spring was turned down by 5 publishers

Jonathan Livingstone Seagull was turned down by 18 publishers

Kon Tiki was turned down by 20 publishers

The Peter Principle was turned down by 16 publishers

But the biggest miscalculation of all was when Frederick Forsyth gave up his job in the News Department of the BBC and wrote a thriller which he submitted to the publishers W.H. Auden. Eight weeks later they rejected it as they were of the view that it had “no reader interest”. He then tried his luck with four other publishers, also with no luck. Eventually one of these publishers, Hutchinsons, changed their mind and agreed to publish it. By 1982 The Day of the Jackal had sold over 8 million copies. Just the American rights were sold to Vicking Press for $365 000 (the equivalent of over $2 000 000 today) - the money being shared 50/50 between Forsyth and Hutchinson. Since then it has been translated into 30 languages.
We even have an example of this type of misjudgement in our own publishing world. Kook en Geniet was originally published by Mrs S.J.A. de Villiers in 1951 in her private capacity after South African publishers had expressed disinterest in it. In 1961 an English version appeared and it is estimated that by 2005 over half a million Afrikaans copies had been sold. Until 1990 she handled everything from printing to distributing of these immensely popular recipe books and at the time of her death in 2010, sales in both languages far exceeded a million copies, making it the most successful South African cookbook ever.

But sometimes even publishers in fact get it right.

On the 1st of June 1938 there appeared the first issue of ‘Action Comics’ which introduced the character of Superman. Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel who created the character believed that “a birdman in the hand is better than two in the bush” and sold all their rights for $130, $65 each. In 2014 a pristine edition of Action Comics No. 1, which had introduced Superman, and had cost a dime (10 cents) in 1938, was sold for $3.2 million in an auction conducted on eBay.

Did you know: Edgar Allan Poe, Margaret Mitchell, and Oscar Wilde each had only one traditional novel published

Sources

David Frost’s Book of the World’s Worst Decisions, Andre Deutsch, 1982

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_Jackal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cook_ 

Contributed by senior member Dan Steyn of Somerset West. ( Professor emeritus)



Friday, 29 September 2017

Coffee route 2018 for the Mother City now available



Yvette and Nicky added:
"In this, our fourth edition, The Coffee Route 2018, we have updated our offerings to reflect the exciting and changing coffee scene in Cape Town. 
There is a real coffee culture in and around Cape Town.  Coffee shops are where Capetonians meet up with friends, catch up on emails, read, write, contemplate the view, contemplate the carrot cake, contemplate life…
In 2015 we published our first The Coffee Route as a guide to the coffee shops that we thought were special and that we wanted to put on the map. We’ve now decided that an  annual update is called for as the coffee scene grows, improves and changes. In this 2018 guide there are updates of some favourites, and some fabulous new additions. 
The shops are still grouped geographically, with a helpful map for each area. Information on what kind of coffee is served,  whether there are plug points and wi-fi, how easy parking is, and what to do in the area, is all still included.
Things just get better and better in the Mother City and surrounds. 
The publication is available at several stockists (Exclusive Books, Wordsworth Books, Bargain Books, Biblophelia Bookshop, Clarke's Bookshop, to name a few) across the Cape Peninsula, including the featured coffee shops.

Gauteng: Available from www.honeybunch.co.za